Dec 152008
 

Nimby header

Many of my friends are closely involved with projects nurtured at Nimby. It is the home of Dance Dance Immolation and
the Steam Punk Tree House and many many many other art projects.

They’re moving and they need a little help with all the initial expenses. Please help out. They are super close to getting the money they need and every bit counts.

What is Nimby?

A place to create the impossible, the new, the ridiculous, the exiting and most importantly, the never seen before. It is the largest do-it-yourself industrial art space in the Bay Area with over 40 different art groups and craftsmen in the shop.

NIMBY not only offers space to create, but supports its artists with resources, assistance in sourcing re-purposed material, as well as logistical and technical guidance. This supportive culture shared by all members of the NIMBY community is at the root of the amazing art that emerges from its doors. NIMBY is the hub for creativity that boggles the mind and fosters community values that encourage collaboration and innovation.


DDI in action, photo by edrabbit

Please donate if you:
have ever enjoyed any of the fire arts housed at Nimby
attended an event
want to get into some badass industrial art
want to support a collaborative, inspiring art house
like fire

NIMBY needs your help!

May 302006
 

Last week on our anniversary Dennis and I went to the de Young museum in Golden gate park. I know some people aren’t very fond of modern art, so this post will probably bore you to death.

I’ve come to realize that modern art is very emo. It’s emo before the word emo was applied to music. I’ve never formally studied this era, so take everything after this is “Karen’s amateur point of view”. Oftentimes people look at painting and think, “WTF? I don’t get this painting” because it’s a bunch of scribbles and dots. Part of this era involves the breakdown of objects into simple elements or geometric shapes (Kandinsky, Miro). Another aspect is how a piece of art makes one feel. This applies to modern art in general, but particularly to artists like Rothko or Pollock since their painting are often composed of blobs of color. For me the work is significant I gain something from it–I’m not a big fan of Pollock because I don’t ‘get it’. Anyway, here are some photos of pieces that I liked.

three fourths machine

A portion of “Three Machines” by Wayne Thiebaud (1963). I really like the texture of this painting. The painting is flat and almost cartooney; It is not trying to look like an actual depiction of gumball machines. One could imagine that it’s a printed ad. However, the paint is laid on thick and you can clearly see the brush strokes. He has very much made personal an object that is mass-produced. It is nostalgic. I wasn’t even around when these types of machines existed, but it is iconic in its familiarity. The unadorned setup is reflective of the simplicity and wholesomeness of my childhood. I wonder if he’s the same person that did the three cakes at SFMOMA. I saw that painting when I was 14ish and it left a very deep impression.

frames
I didn’t bother to note the title or author of these paintings. They were two identical giant canvases. This seems to me a comment on modern day industrial society (probably post pop art, but of similar influence). These two paintings seem exactly alike (mass production), but they can’t be, since they were hand painted. It has this hopeful/cynical note of ‘everyone is special even if you can’t tell the difference’. One of the reasons I took this photo from an angle was to highlight their differences. Namely, that they occupy separate spaces, which is enough to suggest that they are individual. The blank white centers are reflective of the effects of carbon copying on society–flat, soulless, a loss of appreciation for detail and beauty. Their intimidating size made me feel small and insignificant. The clean, straight black lines suggests that there is an absolute boundary that we cannot cross, though some of the best of us may be able to reside at/in the blue line.

lovers
These mannequins are the from “Meat Market (1960-1961)” by George Herms. This was a piece made from items collected from the dump. It’s a rather depressing/disturbing installation but this couple stood out even more than the creepy naked broken doll labeled ‘skirt steak’. Even though these dressmaker mannequins are old, broken and dirty, it was obvious that they represented a couple in love. They are intimately close and the female looks like she’s leaning into the male and he looks like he’s about to kiss her; if they had arms, they would be embracing. Considering the title of the art, though, she may just be leaning in to whisper her price to the man. However, the romantic in me prefers to believe the former.

May 302006
 

Last week on our anniversary Dennis and I went to the de Young museum in Golden gate park. I know some people aren’t very fond of modern art, so this post will probably bore you to death.

I’ve come to realize that modern art is very emo. It’s emo before the word emo was applied to music. I’ve never formally studied this era, so take everything after this is “Karen’s amateur point of view”. Oftentimes people look at painting and think, “WTF? I don’t get this painting” because it’s a bunch of scribbles and dots. Part of this era involves the breakdown of objects into simple elements or geometric shapes (Kandinsky, Miro). Another aspect is how a piece of art makes one feel. This applies to modern art in general, but particularly to artists like Rothko or Pollock since their painting are often composed of blobs of color. For me the work is significant I gain something from it–I’m not a big fan of Pollock because I don’t ‘get it’. Anyway, here are some photos of pieces that I liked.

three fourths machine

A portion of “Three Machines” by Wayne Thiebaud (1963). I really like the texture of this painting. The painting is flat and almost cartooney; It is not trying to look like an actual depiction of gumball machines. One could imagine that it’s a printed ad. However, the paint is laid on thick and you can clearly see the brush strokes. He has very much made personal an object that is mass-produced. It is nostalgic. I wasn’t even around when these types of machines existed, but it is iconic in its familiarity. The unadorned setup is reflective of the simplicity and wholesomeness of my childhood. I wonder if he’s the same person that did the three cakes at SFMOMA. I saw that painting when I was 14ish and it left a very deep impression.

frames
I didn’t bother to note the title or author of these paintings. They were two identical giant canvases. This seems to me a comment on modern day industrial society (probably post pop art, but of similar influence). These two paintings seem exactly alike (mass production), but they can’t be, since they were hand painted. It has this hopeful/cynical note of ‘everyone is special even if you can’t tell the difference’. One of the reasons I took this photo from an angle was to highlight their differences. Namely, that they occupy separate spaces, which is enough to suggest that they are individual. The blank white centers are reflective of the effects of carbon copying on society–flat, soulless, a loss of appreciation for detail and beauty. Their intimidating size made me feel small and insignificant. The clean, straight black lines suggests that there is an absolute boundary that we cannot cross, though some of the best of us may be able to reside at/in the blue line.

lovers
These mannequins are the from “Meat Market (1960-1961)” by George Herms. This was a piece made from items collected from the dump. It’s a rather depressing/disturbing installation but this couple stood out even more than the creepy naked broken doll labeled ‘skirt steak’. Even though these dressmaker mannequins are old, broken and dirty, it was obvious that they represented a couple in love. They are intimately close and the female looks like she’s leaning into the male and he looks like he’s about to kiss her; if they had arms, they would be embracing. Considering the title of the art, though, she may just be leaning in to whisper her price to the man. However, the romantic in me prefers to believe the former.

Aug 032005
 

Every third Sunday of the month, entrance is free to the Vatican
Museum.  I intended to arrive at 6 to stand in line, but I ended
up there at 8.  In any case, Sarah and Julie and I got into the
museum around 9.  The Vatican Museum is amazing.  There is so
much stuff there—beautiful
and famous paintings, astounding amounts of Greek and Egyptian
artifacts–items from cities that they have pillaged and burned. 
I suppose, though, that many of pieces were legitimately bought or
gifted.  There were huge crowds of people, especially in the
Egyptian and Greek section.  I almost wanted to strangle a woman
who pointed to a statue of Anubis and said in a loud voice, “Oh! 
I know this one.  This is, um, that guy that takes people to the
Underworld.”  Her response to her daughter’s asking the meaning of
the Underworld, “It’s hell.  The place where the bad people
go.”  She made me so angry, and then disheartened to think that a
huge chunk of America has probably had the same lack of
cultural/historical education.  I can only hope that she know a
lot more about some other field.  Looking back on it, though, I
wonder if I am too much of an academic elitist, as my sister once said.
However, inside the Pinacoteca in front of The Transfiguration made me
aware of how little I know about art and has stirred up a strong need
to learn.

Last week we went to see Aida at an outdoor opera house, and it was a
lot of fun.  The venue itself was a bit of a disappointment. 
The acoustics were (predictably) bad, and the set was very minimalist
and yet, too busy. There was a random naked scene in the middle of the
second act, where a slender woman rises out of a bath to be dressed by
her attendants.  I didn’t understand it’s significance, but after
some short discussion with fellow students, we concluded that the scene
was merely there to hold people’s attention.  It’s just exciting
to be able to catch a word here or there and understand it.  All
the students were all dolled up, and everyone looked so good.  I
really love it when people dress up because they all just look so
shiny.  The amusing style of choice for the night was coordinating
ties and forehead bandanas worn by 3 Santa Barbara boys.  

This morning the sky was crying (I often get rain and cry mixed up in
Italian–piangere and piovere), and it was the most comforting event I
have experienced thus far.  There was lightning and thunder and it
rained pretty hard for a while.  The air was cool and fresh and it
reminded me of home.  This time, it rained before we started
walking to school (which happened a few weeks ago, when the clouds
drained buckets on us as we ran barefoot the rest of the way to
school), but it was so serene, that I couldn’t bring myself to go to
class.