May 132007
 

It’s been quite a busy week.

Elaine
Click!
On Saturday the lovely Miss Icka and Elaine came by to do a photo shoot. I was quite honored that they wanted to use our home as a set. There was drinks and fruit (naturally) and lots of fun. Here’s a little preview. I can’t wait to see the whole set. While they set up Dennis and I got our nails done. I absolutely love my sparkly barbie-pink toenails.

Street fest
Sunday Morgan, Dennis and I decided to stand outside in the full blazing sunlight (easily 90 degrees) for a few hours at the How Weird fest. There was some good music and I tried a french doughnut for the first time. The little vendor stands sold some fantastic hand-made clothing and jewelery, but I decided against buying anything in anticipation of next week’s tentative shopping plans. We bumped into a number of wonderful friends and I found out that Juicy and Steve23 are getting married. Congrats to them.

Mooooooooooo

After unsuccessfully poking at a few people to join me, I attend the Moo Meetup alone. Since I’ve been to a few geek-ish events before, I found a few people I knew including James (hotornot) and Brian Caldwell. Lane Hartwell was there, but she was surrounded by people. I’d like to meet her at some point. She takes such lovely photos. Yummy snack plates floated around piled with samosas, avocado sushi, dumplings, fruit tarts, chocolate covered strawberries, and other treats. A very sweet server named Ryan made me a plate of sushi with wasabi and ginger after finding out that I wasn’t interested in the meat appetizers. Drinks were on the house, but I wisely refrained from having more than one.

I picked up a bag of treats on my way out. One of the candies looked like it was encased styrofoam, but due to my willingness to try anything (especially if it smells like sweet tarts), I found out it was just thick rice paper. The inside was filled with pixie stick dust. Yum. The blue-flash disposible camera is begging to be used. I also got some adorable moo notecards, a much-needed moocard container, a livejournal pencil (um an online blogging site gives out pencils? I can’t remember the last time I saw a pencil sharpener. I think I’ll use it to poke my coworkers) and other nicknacks.

Goodies
Wednesday night I managed to get tickets to the SF film fest Golden Gate Award Ceremony at Cowell Theater. The appetizers were fantastic. They had goodies from Yoshi’s (I think the guy was offended that I called his amazing sushi snacks), Ramblas, La Mediterranee, Sky Vodka, Glacieu and some others. Yoshi’s tuna sashimi was deelish. I haven’t been there in a really long time, but I think a trip is needed in the near future.

Right before the ceremony starts I bumped into a filmmaker I met in Tribeca. Small world. Inside the theater the screen was rotating through all the logos of the sponsors. There is something about seeing the jumpcut logo on a giant screen that makes me feel all warm and fuzzy inside. After they announced the winner of the jumpcut-run Greenworld contest, I quickly got bored and left for the afterparty at Mighty. I turned into a pumpkin before I saw Halou, but they music is pretty good. On my way out I scooped up a bag full of more goodies. The best treat was definitely the canvas bag itself, which I will be using for my groceries.

Whew! This weekend all I want to do is sleep.

Jan 172007
 

Jumpcut is a giant piece of poo. Seriously, it is painfully slow (worse than last.fm) and I will not be surprised if we loose users over this. The fix is coming, and I can’t wait.

Macworld was a lot of fun. I bought this pink jelly keyboard cover for my mac. It dampens the clicky noise and keeps crap off of the keys. There were a ridiculous number of ipod accessories. I don’t need 1,000 ways I can cover my ipod, but I guess some people do.

I’m crying because all my photos are 640×480. I had changed the resolution on my camera last week for a stop animation movie I was doing (I gave up. It was too hard), and I never changed it back. I love having big photos because I want the option to print them large (also I have a huge screen so I want large photos in case I want to use any of them as a background).

macgirls prison break
I made some movies, but Jumpcut is broken right now so I’ll post them later. I got to hang out with (congrats!) and for a bit but I spent the majority of my time with ijustine and ashot. Justine is the first person I’ve gotten to know online and then met IRL. We got along beautifully. I had a blast running around doing silly things with her. I think my coworker was mildly amused at how emotional and weird I can be. I think the reason why I like ijustine so much is that she’s very comfortable with herself.

The one unifying trait about all of my friends is that they (you) are a bit weird (I mean that lovingly) and very much ok with it. The world ‘comfortable’ has some negative connotation in that it suggests contentment, or no desire to change. To be precise, I mean ‘someone who can express his thoughts or emotions without crippling paranoia of societal judgment.’ There is no denying that we are social creatures and the opinions of others matter but there has to be a reasonable point at which one stops caring. The people I surround myself with are both supportive and constructively critical. I appreciate being called on my shit.

Jan 172007
 

Jumpcut is a giant piece of poo. Seriously, it is painfully slow (worse than last.fm) and I will not be surprised if we loose users over this. The fix is coming, and I can’t wait.

Macworld was a lot of fun. I bought this pink jelly keyboard cover for my mac. It dampens the clicky noise and keeps crap off of the keys. There were a ridiculous number of ipod accessories. I don’t need 1,000 ways I can cover my ipod, but I guess some people do.

I’m crying because all my photos are 640×480. I had changed the resolution on my camera last week for a stop animation movie I was doing (I gave up. It was too hard), and I never changed it back. I love having big photos because I want the option to print them large (also I have a huge screen so I want large photos in case I want to use any of them as a background).

macgirls prison break
I made some movies, but Jumpcut is broken right now so I’ll post them later. I got to hang out with (congrats!) and for a bit but I spent the majority of my time with ijustine and ashot. Justine is the first person I’ve gotten to know online and then met IRL. We got along beautifully. I had a blast running around doing silly things with her. I think my coworker was mildly amused at how emotional and weird I can be. I think the reason why I like ijustine so much is that she’s very comfortable with herself.

The one unifying trait about all of my friends is that they (you) are a bit weird (I mean that lovingly) and very much ok with it. The world ‘comfortable’ has some negative connotation in that it suggests contentment, or no desire to change. To be precise, I mean ‘someone who can express his thoughts or emotions without crippling paranoia of societal judgment.’ There is no denying that we are social creatures and the opinions of others matter but there has to be a reasonable point at which one stops caring. The people I surround myself with are both supportive and constructively critical. I appreciate being called on my shit.

May 302006
 

Last week on our anniversary Dennis and I went to the de Young museum in Golden gate park. I know some people aren’t very fond of modern art, so this post will probably bore you to death.

I’ve come to realize that modern art is very emo. It’s emo before the word emo was applied to music. I’ve never formally studied this era, so take everything after this is “Karen’s amateur point of view”. Oftentimes people look at painting and think, “WTF? I don’t get this painting” because it’s a bunch of scribbles and dots. Part of this era involves the breakdown of objects into simple elements or geometric shapes (Kandinsky, Miro). Another aspect is how a piece of art makes one feel. This applies to modern art in general, but particularly to artists like Rothko or Pollock since their painting are often composed of blobs of color. For me the work is significant I gain something from it–I’m not a big fan of Pollock because I don’t ‘get it’. Anyway, here are some photos of pieces that I liked.

three fourths machine

A portion of “Three Machines” by Wayne Thiebaud (1963). I really like the texture of this painting. The painting is flat and almost cartooney; It is not trying to look like an actual depiction of gumball machines. One could imagine that it’s a printed ad. However, the paint is laid on thick and you can clearly see the brush strokes. He has very much made personal an object that is mass-produced. It is nostalgic. I wasn’t even around when these types of machines existed, but it is iconic in its familiarity. The unadorned setup is reflective of the simplicity and wholesomeness of my childhood. I wonder if he’s the same person that did the three cakes at SFMOMA. I saw that painting when I was 14ish and it left a very deep impression.

frames
I didn’t bother to note the title or author of these paintings. They were two identical giant canvases. This seems to me a comment on modern day industrial society (probably post pop art, but of similar influence). These two paintings seem exactly alike (mass production), but they can’t be, since they were hand painted. It has this hopeful/cynical note of ‘everyone is special even if you can’t tell the difference’. One of the reasons I took this photo from an angle was to highlight their differences. Namely, that they occupy separate spaces, which is enough to suggest that they are individual. The blank white centers are reflective of the effects of carbon copying on society–flat, soulless, a loss of appreciation for detail and beauty. Their intimidating size made me feel small and insignificant. The clean, straight black lines suggests that there is an absolute boundary that we cannot cross, though some of the best of us may be able to reside at/in the blue line.

lovers
These mannequins are the from “Meat Market (1960-1961)” by George Herms. This was a piece made from items collected from the dump. It’s a rather depressing/disturbing installation but this couple stood out even more than the creepy naked broken doll labeled ‘skirt steak’. Even though these dressmaker mannequins are old, broken and dirty, it was obvious that they represented a couple in love. They are intimately close and the female looks like she’s leaning into the male and he looks like he’s about to kiss her; if they had arms, they would be embracing. Considering the title of the art, though, she may just be leaning in to whisper her price to the man. However, the romantic in me prefers to believe the former.

May 302006
 

Last week on our anniversary Dennis and I went to the de Young museum in Golden gate park. I know some people aren’t very fond of modern art, so this post will probably bore you to death.

I’ve come to realize that modern art is very emo. It’s emo before the word emo was applied to music. I’ve never formally studied this era, so take everything after this is “Karen’s amateur point of view”. Oftentimes people look at painting and think, “WTF? I don’t get this painting” because it’s a bunch of scribbles and dots. Part of this era involves the breakdown of objects into simple elements or geometric shapes (Kandinsky, Miro). Another aspect is how a piece of art makes one feel. This applies to modern art in general, but particularly to artists like Rothko or Pollock since their painting are often composed of blobs of color. For me the work is significant I gain something from it–I’m not a big fan of Pollock because I don’t ‘get it’. Anyway, here are some photos of pieces that I liked.

three fourths machine

A portion of “Three Machines” by Wayne Thiebaud (1963). I really like the texture of this painting. The painting is flat and almost cartooney; It is not trying to look like an actual depiction of gumball machines. One could imagine that it’s a printed ad. However, the paint is laid on thick and you can clearly see the brush strokes. He has very much made personal an object that is mass-produced. It is nostalgic. I wasn’t even around when these types of machines existed, but it is iconic in its familiarity. The unadorned setup is reflective of the simplicity and wholesomeness of my childhood. I wonder if he’s the same person that did the three cakes at SFMOMA. I saw that painting when I was 14ish and it left a very deep impression.

frames
I didn’t bother to note the title or author of these paintings. They were two identical giant canvases. This seems to me a comment on modern day industrial society (probably post pop art, but of similar influence). These two paintings seem exactly alike (mass production), but they can’t be, since they were hand painted. It has this hopeful/cynical note of ‘everyone is special even if you can’t tell the difference’. One of the reasons I took this photo from an angle was to highlight their differences. Namely, that they occupy separate spaces, which is enough to suggest that they are individual. The blank white centers are reflective of the effects of carbon copying on society–flat, soulless, a loss of appreciation for detail and beauty. Their intimidating size made me feel small and insignificant. The clean, straight black lines suggests that there is an absolute boundary that we cannot cross, though some of the best of us may be able to reside at/in the blue line.

lovers
These mannequins are the from “Meat Market (1960-1961)” by George Herms. This was a piece made from items collected from the dump. It’s a rather depressing/disturbing installation but this couple stood out even more than the creepy naked broken doll labeled ‘skirt steak’. Even though these dressmaker mannequins are old, broken and dirty, it was obvious that they represented a couple in love. They are intimately close and the female looks like she’s leaning into the male and he looks like he’s about to kiss her; if they had arms, they would be embracing. Considering the title of the art, though, she may just be leaning in to whisper her price to the man. However, the romantic in me prefers to believe the former.

Mar 112006
 

So Flickr is awesome (aside from the name. I swear, this generation of kids will not know how to spell anything correctly. ie KrispyKreme, tho, b4, dunkin, lay-zee-boy, kwik, nite). Flickr has a great interface, lots of useful functionality, and stores the full-sized image. For $24 a year, you get unlimited storage among other cool things.

So what’s the problem? Well, I want to make my own photo site for my photos. I doubt my site would be nearly as nifty, but I think it would be an interesting project to work on. I could do it, so why shouldn’t I? Though, at the same time, I want my photos up now. Like, right now. There’s also the economic perspective: each person works at what he does best, and then trades that for other things he needs. So at a mere $24 a year, it’s more economical to pay for flickr than to put in hours making my own less complicated site. Hell, this is exactly why I use livejournal. Still, it would be so much nicer to have my own site, for no other reason than to say, ‘Ya, I made that.’

Hmm… this must be why people have children instead of adopt them. It takes so little time to make, but most parents seem quite proud of the accomplishment. Though, I wonder what would happen if there were a baby factory that produced top-quality babies for reasonable prices, or sperm and egg purchase became extremely cheap. Would people continue to make their own?